I lost my dad to Fox News: How a generation was captured by thrashing hysteria 

My god, take the words right out of my mouth.

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VIA: highlycharged ORIGINALLY FROM: jessehimself
UGH    faux news    i fucking hate fox news    and how it helped turned some family members into full-blown racists    UGh    
somewhereallthetime:

Thanks for the suggestion, talesnshiz. So far, so good!

Oh, just you wait.

somewhereallthetime:

Thanks for the suggestion, talesnshiz. So far, so good!

Oh, just you wait.

never let me go    kazuo ishiguro    tears    my eyes    my creys    

nickiminajsasshole:

trying to be a part of conversations like

image

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VIA: morismako ORIGINALLY FROM: nickiminajsasshole
OH GOD    this is so perfect on every level    about me    lmao    

Why do I have to erase EVERYTHING on my phone just because I bought a new computer, Apple? Let me use two libraries for my one phone. Why? Why? Whyyyyyyy?

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STAHP YOU PIECE OF SHIT    apple    apple computers    iphone    maybe i should just switch to android    

Ever since switching to a Mac all my technology has had major problems. Why is Apple such an asshole about what I can and can’t do with my fucking iphone? UGH. Nothin gut problems since all these new updates. This is such bullshit!

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apple    mac    iphone    apple computers    

wine and cheese yall~

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yes    wine and cheese    sunday night    
yep, this is definitely a problem.

yep, this is definitely a problem.

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VIA: amandaonwriting ORIGINALLY FROM: word-stuck
it's not even big things    but just little stuff    but it makes me feel less anxiety but i feel so shitty for doing it at the same time    DOUBLE EDGED SWORD    
whengothgoesbrown:

Glass typewriter.

whengothgoesbrown:

Glass typewriter.

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VIA: yeahwriters ORIGINALLY FROM: behance.net
WANT    so beautiful    omg    the sounds it would make    ugghhh    writing    typewriter    
amandaonwriting:

250 ways to say ‘went’
Buy the Poster: WriteAtHome

amandaonwriting:

250 ways to say ‘went’

Buy the Poster: WriteAtHome

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yessss    writing    reference    

Outcomes of Care for 16,924 Planned Home Births in the United States: The Midwives Alliance of North America Statistics Project, 2004 to 2009 - Cheyney - 2014 - Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health - Wiley Online Library 

cranquis:

This 2014 article is the biggest study to date to analyze medical records (as opposed to just reviewing birth certificate data) and compare outcomes of low-risk pregnancies delivered at home vs in hospital. A couple of fascinating findings:

  • Caesarean-section (C-section) rates for low-risk home births: 5.2%
  • Meanwhile, C-section rates for low-risk hospital births in the US: 31%
  • 89% of women completed the birth at home rather than being transferred to hospital. (The other 11% mainly transferred due to Failure to Progress).
  • Only 1% of babies born at home required transfer to the hospital after birth, and most transfers were for non-urgent conditions.
  • Babies born to low-risk mothers at home had no higher risk of death in labor or the first few weeks of life than those in comparable studies of similarly low-risk pregnancies delivered in hospital.

I don’t think I’ve mentioned this before on the blog, but both of our sons were planned to be home-births. We had to transfer to hospital with the first because the labor was just going WAY too long (27 hours is plenty, wouldn’t you say?) and the Mrs. needed some pain relief; but the second son was born at home. Neither child had any adverse outcomes, praise God.

Before we had our first child, it took me a LONG time (years, really) to come to grips with the idea of “home birth” — and this was AFTER my medical training, which included delivering over 50 low-risk babies! Thankfully, we found a very patient, well-trained and well-spoken midwife who was able to assuage all of my doctorly misgivings (and frankly, on some points, misinformation) re: the risks of attempting to complete our low-risk pregnancies at home. Now, reading this study makes me even more certain (retrospectively) that we made the right choices for our family.

Certainly, there is still a HUGE need for in-hospital, MD-managed deliveries (including C-sections), most obviously among “high-risk” pregnancies — but as rates of “unplanned”/”elective” C-sections (with the known adverse outcomes and financial costs they entail) continue to rise among low-risk mothers/babies in hospital births, I have come to believe that the medical community owes it to all future parents and babies to:

  • read the research
  • assuage our fears of the unknown
  • acknowledge some of our unfounded biases against the midwives and/or home-births and/or “a baby being born without an ICD-10 code being generated”, and
  • be willing to “allow” (and even promote — gasp!) midwife-managed home-births for a greater proportion of low-risk pregnancies in the US.
 
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VIA: cranquis
ob gyn    babies    birth    at home births    c-section